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Daily Coronavirus Updates, March 21. What to Know About COVID-19 in Seattle, Washington, DC և Worldwide

As Americans continue to be vaccinated against the coronavirus, more than a dozen states have now confirmed at least one case found in Brazil.

The Puyalup School District in Washington plans to group students into larger groups, even when the district is dealing with COVID-19 cases. And the Seattleites are bidding farewell to Remo Borracchini’s beloved Bakery & Mediterranean Market on Rainier Avenue South, which closes after nearly 100 years of doing business as weddings and other special events slowed during the epidemic.

We are updating this page with the latest news on the COVID-19 epidemic ազդեց its impact in Seattle, USA և worldwide. Click here to see the live updates of the previous days լուս coverage of all our coronaviruses և here to see how we are catching up և with the daily spread in Washington և around the world.

COVID-19 profoundly changed schooling. In a way, for the better

There is no return.

This is the consensus that emerges from education leaders across the country when a nation enters an epidemic in its second year of schooling.

Arizona District is trying to provide services for parents who have taken their children out of home school. In Oklahoma, students say where and when they study. And educators everywhere are paying more attention to the mental well-being of students.

“None of us would ever want to go through that,” said Deborah Gist, Tulsa, Oklahoma School Inspector. “Now we have the opportunity to make it something that will change teaching and learning for the better forever.”

Read the full story here.

– Peggy Barmore, Hatchinger Report

Grandparents in the epidemic. Lost year, but now some have hope

13-year-old Brillie Carter և 17-year-old Kobe Kalhun share a laugh with their grandmother, Doris Rollark, at Rollark's daughter's house on March 7, 2021, in Monroe, Ohio.  (Dan Sewell / Associated Press)
13-year-old Brillie Carter և 17-year-old Kobe Kalhun share a laugh with their grandmother, Doris Rollark, at Rollark’s daughter’s house on March 7, 2021, in Monroe, Ohio. (Dan Sewell / Associated Press)

CINCINNATI – Popcorn չ There is no sleepiness in Disney movies. No dance recitations or holiday competitions, especially grandparents’ holidays to visit the children’s classroom.

No hugs.

The first 12 months of the epidemic are considered by many to be a lost year for the largest group of grandparents in US history. Most of the nation’s approximately 70 million grandparents are in the fourth quarter of their lives, and the clock is still ticking.

“As I work with older people, I see a lot of depression, a lot of loneliness,” said Nick Nicholson, a nursing professor and researcher at the University of Quinnipiac in Hamden, Connecticut. “It was really difficult – anxiety, despair, social isolation. There are so many negative effects during the year. The sooner we expand the bubble, the better, the more people will be able to heal together. ”

Read the full story here.

– Dan Sewell, Associated Press

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